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17 Divinity St
Bristol, CT, 06010
United States

8605895155

Since 1975, O'Donnell Bros has been providing greater Bristol and Central Connecticut with residential and commercial remodeling solutions. We specialize in roofing, siding, windows, doors, gutters, downspouts and so much more. We look forward to helping you with all your remodeling needs. 

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Articles

O'Donnell Bros President, Bob O'Donnell, is a regular contributor to The Bristol Press. Read his home improvement articles here.

 

In the Market for a New Roof? Know Your Options

Chelsea O'Donnell

With April showers often come leaks, which means roof replacement is on lots of homeowner’s minds this time of year. When thinking about a new roof, finding the right contractor, negotiating the best price, and deciding on the color and style are just a few of the options to navigate. But in the past, one thing homeowners often didn’t have to think about was the material, as asphalt roofs have been the most popular choice in our area for their cost-effectiveness and durability. But recently, metal has begun increasing in popularity. While metal roofs are more common in areas of the country with more extreme weather conditions, it’s always good to know about the different options available. So let’s take a deeper dive into the pros and cons of asphalt and metal roofs to help you make the best decision for your home.

The Asphalt Roof

Asphalt is the most popular choice with homeowners for a variety of reasons, but the single most important factor is almost always the price. The average cost to purchase the materials for an asphalt roof is nearly one-third of the cost of a metal roof. That cost differentiation gives asphalt the leg up almost every time. In addition to being the more cost-effective option of the two choices, there is a lot to love about asphalt. Individual shingles give a homeowner lots of color and design choices, and they are faster to install than a metal roof, often taking just a few days of labor. While most asphalt roofs come with a 30-year warranty, they are easy to repair if damaged, and a small section can be replaced without having to get a whole new roof. The material also performs exceptionally well in the rain, heat, sleet, and snow.

Of course, there are a few negative aspects of asphalt roofing that homeowners should be aware of. If you’re installing a new asphalt roof, I always recommend removing the old roof before installing new material, which does add to the labor cost. Another negative factor is the chance that mold, mildew, and algae will grow if a roof is shaded and stays damp for long periods of time. Also, while our Connecticut weather isn’t as severe as other parts of the country, very high winds can loosen shingles if they aren’t installed properly.

The Metal Roof

Even though they aren’t as common in our area, metal roofs have some very attractive qualities that make them worth considering. Firstly, the material is lighter than traditional asphalt roofs, and the metal sheets can often be installed right over regular asphalt as long as it doesn’t have water damage or rotten plywood underneath. Metal roofs also last longer than asphalt roofs, and maintenance is minimal. Mold and mildew cannot grow on metal so if you live in a damp area with lots of shade, this might be a worthwhile benefit. Another plus is that metal roofs are energy efficient all year round, helping to keep the house cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Plus they perform very well in areas with very high-level snowfall.

Of course, there are a few cons that homeowners should be aware of, and the biggest one is cost. While metal roofs do last longer, the upfront cost can be three times as much as an asphalt roof. Additionally, if a metal roof needs to be repaired, that will also cost more as metal roofs are made in sheets and need to be replaced in that way. From an aesthetic perspective, metal roofs do come in different colors, but there aren't many more options in terms of design and aesthetic. Finally, it’s important to know that without the proper plywood installation and insulation, metal roofs can be noisy, which might not be a con for people who love the sound of rain storms.

No matter which material you use, it’s important to do your research to find the best product for your individual home. The right roof with the right contractor at the right price will ensure that you live comfortably with peace of mind for many years to come.

Bob O’Donnell is the owner of O’Donnell Bros. Inc., a Bristol-based home improvement company established in 1975. Email your questions to info@odonnellbros.com with the subject line “Ask the Pro.” All questions may be considered for publication. To contact Bob for your remodeling needs, call O’Donnell Bros. Inc. at (860) 589-5155 or visit http://www.odonnellbros.com. Advice is for guidance only.

April Showers Bring Roof Mold

Chelsea O'Donnell

Warmer temperatures and rain can only mean one thing this time of year. It’s roof mold season. My phone rings off the hook for cleanings in April and May when moisture and humidity kick into high gear, giving mold and mildew the perfect opportunity to thrive. So what’s with the black, streaky stains popping up on everyone’s houses and what can you do to get rid of them?

Stains on the roof are generally algae, which gets carried by wind or birds from roof to roof, and may not be visible until they have enough moisture, heat, and humidity to grow and spread. Now don’t be too alarmed, algae isn’t necessarily going to ruin your roof immediately, but it does affect the curb appeal of your home and the problem could end up damaging and pulling up your shingles if not dealt with for a long period of time.
An interesting fact is that copper, zinc, and lead are toxic to algae, and many newer roof shingles contain copper granules, which act as a barrier against any mold growth. Homes with older roofs won’t benefit from this technology, but it explains why you won’t see algae where metal flashing has been installed. If you’re susceptible to algae and in the market for a new roof, be sure to inquire about this type of shingle.

So now that we know what it is, how do we get rid of it? The easiest way to rid your roof of algae is a good cleaning solution, which can be picked up at the hardware store, applied using a pump sprayer and rinsed with the garden hose. One tip is to give any plants below the roof a good drink of water beforehand so they don’t absorb the solution. If you’re not comfortable on a ladder, call a professional to help you complete this task. A clean roof isn’t worth a trip to the hospital, and a local area home improvement specialist will be able to complete the job in just a few hours.

Once the roof has been cleaned, you might want to do something to prevent the mold from coming back again. As I mentioned, copper, zinc and lead-coated sheet metal are toxic to algae, so installing a strip of flashing will help stop that nasty fungus in its tracks. Choose a strip that’s at least six inches wide, and have it installed at the roof peak to ensure that the metal molecules wash down with the rain and protect the roof from mold build up.

Bob O’Donnell is the owner of O’Donnell Bros. Inc., a Bristol-based home improvement company established in 1975. Email your questions for Bob to info@odonnellbros.com with the subject line “Ask the Pro.” All questions may be considered for publication. To contact Bob for your remodeling needs, call O’Donnell Bros. Inc. at (860) 589-5155 or visit http://www.odonnellbros.com. Advice is for guidance only.

Thinking of Building a Tiny House? Here’s What You Need To Know

Chelsea O'Donnell

Tiny houses have exploded in recent years with more and more people ditching expensive mortgages and time-consuming maintenance in favor of downsized dwellings.  In addition to being cost-effective, tiny house living has a lot of interesting perks that make it a fun option for home ownership on a budget. Interested in learning more? Here are a few things you need to know before taking the plunge.

Let’s start with some stats. A tiny house is usually between 100 and 400 square feet, which will be a huge adjustment considering that the average American house size is 2,500 square feet. To put the size of a tiny house into perspective, you could fit 144 of them inside a football field. That’s a lot of houses in a little space!

If you think tiny homes are for millennials, you’re in the dark. In fact, two out of five tiny house owners are over 50 years old, making them a smart choice for both the young and adventurous and people looking to downsize and have less to worry about in retirement.

The average tiny house on wheels costs about $50,000 to build, while a house on a foundation can cost upwards of $110,000 or more depending on the bells and whistles. From an investment perspective, realtor.com reports that homes less than 500 square feet are appreciating twice as fast as the overall market (19% vs. 9%).

Speaking of money, it seems tiny house owners are more financially comfortable too.  It is reported that 89% of tiny home dwellers have less credit card debt than the average American and 60% of have no credit card debt at all. Tiny house owners have are even reported to have 55% more savings in the bank than the average homeowner.

So where do you start? Interestingly enough, an Austin, Texas-based construction company called Icon just unveiled the first-ever 3-D printed home in the U.S.. The 350-square foot home took just 48 hours to print and cost about $10,000 to create, though the company estimates that it will be printing 600 to 800 square foot houses for around $4,000 and will begin taking orders nationally in 2020.

If this new technology is a bit too hot off the presses for you, there are tons of more traditional options to consider, many of which use traditional building methods and materials on a smaller scale. Locally, Craft and Sprout is a Greenwich, Connecticut-based tiny house company with 20 years of experience in custom building. B&B Tiny Homes in North Adams, Massachusetts is another local builder that specializes in traditional and modern tiny homes with a truckload of customization options. Finally, I’d suggest taking a look at Wind River Tiny Homes for beautiful, unique designs. They are a bit further afield in Chattanooga, Tennesee, but their craftsmanship is hard to beat.

Have you thought about tiny home living? Do you have a local builder that you recommend? I’d love to hear from you, send me a message on Facebook at facebook.com/odonnellbros.

Bob O'Donnell is the owner of O'Donnell Bros, Inc., a Bristol-based home improvement company established in 1975. Email your questions for Bob to info@odonnellbros.com with the subject line “Ask the Pro”. All questions may be considered for publication. To contact Bob for your remodeling needs, call O'Donnell Bros, Inc. at (860) 589-5155 or visit www.odonnellbros.com. Advice is for guidance only.