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17 Divinity St
Bristol, CT, 06010
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8605895155

Since 1975, O'Donnell Bros has been providing greater Bristol and Central Connecticut with residential and commercial remodeling solutions. We specialize in roofing, siding, windows, doors, gutters, downspouts and so much more. We look forward to helping you with all your remodeling needs. 

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Articles

O'Donnell Bros President, Bob O'Donnell, is a regular contributor to The Bristol Press. Read his home improvement articles here.

 

Filtering by Tag: summer

10 Home Maintenance Jobs To Get Prepped For Fall

Chelsea O'Donnell

Summer may be unofficially over but with the first day of autumn still a few weeks away, there is plenty of time to get your home and yard in tip-top shape before the cooler weather sets in. With the countdown on, I’ve rounded up the most important jobs for you to tackle to get ready for the fall. Let’s get busy!

Clean windows and inspect for gaps.

If you have window A/C units, tackle this job as you’re removing them. Windows are a prime culprit for heat loss, so have a look at all the windows in your home to see if you have any gaps. Small cracks and crevices can be sealed with caulk, but you’ll want to fill larger gaps with insulation or expandable foam. If you have single pane aluminum windows and you’re freezing every winter, it might be time for an upgrade. 

Clean and store outdoor furniture.

If furniture is left outdoors during the winter, it will likely crack, split or rust - depending on the material.  Before you turn it in for the winter, be sure to clean it well to avoid rot or damage and check for signs of mold and mildew. A thorough wash with hot soapy water or household cleaner will do the trick.

Reseal your deck.

The summer sun can be brutal on your deck, but so is the onset of snow, sleet, and freezing rain that we can expect over the next several months. Protect your wood by removing any leaves, sticks and those pesky helicopters, and follow it up with a good power wash. When the wood is dry, apply a protective sealant to condition the deck and help it stand up to winter. 

Inspect your doors and apply weatherstripping.

Just like your windows, your doors are prime areas for air leaks. Inspect the areas around your doors and make sure they are airtight by repairing any old weatherstripping or broken door sweeps. Heating a home all winter costs a lot of money so don’t make it more expensive than it should be. An energy efficient home is a happy home.

Patch that leaky roof.

If the summer rain uncovered a leak in your ceiling or attic, don’t wait to have it looked at. The unpredictable winter can be a disaster for a roof that’s already damaged, so don’t hold out until it’s too late. Often times a small repair can stop the problem in its tracks. 

Clean your gutters and check for clogs. 

I went into detail about this one last week but it’s worth another mention. We’re in for a stellar leaf peeping season, but for us homeowners that also means a lot of headaches in the clean-up department. Make sure your gutters and downspouts are prepared for the seasonal shed and flush everything through to ensure the water flow-through is up to par.

Get adequate insulation.

If you’re dreading another teeth-chattering winter, it’s time to add some insulation to your home. Over 75 percent of houses that I visit in our area don’t have enough insulation and because of it, I get too many calls from frozen homeowners wondering what they can do. Insulation is inexpensive to install, can be done in less than a day and adds more to the resale value of your home than any other project. This one is a no brainer.

Scrub out your garbage cans.

As the cold sets in, our furry friends get more desperate for food and will start visiting your trash looking for a free meal. Their sense of smell is uncanny so make sure your bins are cleaned out and future garbage is bagged properly. You don’t want rodents making their homes too close to yours.

Replace your air filters.

If your A/C has been cranking all summer, it’s a great time to clean and/or replace your air filtration systems. While you’re at it, have a look at all your vents including the dryer and remove any built-up debris. The harder those appliances have to work, the more they are going to cost you. 

Inspect the hot water heater.

Don’t wait until it’s too late. Check your water heater for any decay or sediment build-up and be on the lookout for leaks or faulty pipes. If you have an inkling that the unit might be on the fritz, call in a pro for a routine inspection. It’s better to be safe than sorry come winter. 

Bob O’Donnell is the owner of O’Donnell Bros. Inc., a Bristol-based home improvement company established in 1975. Email your questions to info@odonnellbros.com with the subject line “Ask the Pro.” All questions may be considered for publication. To contact Bob for your remodeling needs, call O’Donnell Bros. Inc. at (860) 589-5155 or visit http://www.odonnellbros.com. Advice is for guidance only.


Seven Fun Outdoor Projects for the Last Week of Summer 

Chelsea O'Donnell

With only one week of summer left, I can imagine that parents and grandparents are pretty exhausted of ideas to keep the kids occupied before school starts. That being said, fall will be here before we know it and the weather will be cool again. So let’s make the most of our last days with some of my favorite outdoor activities that the young ones will love - and you will too. 

Plant a Wagon Herb Garden

Gardening is a great way to teach kids responsibility and it’s a lot less messy than getting a family pet. Grab an old wagon or wheelbarrow from the shed or a local garage sale and drill some holes in it. Then let the kids choose their own herbs to plant and grow. I like basil, mint, cilantro, rosemary, and thyme because they all come up quickly and offer a lot of versatility in the kitchen. 

Build a Lemonade Stand

Entrepreneurship at its finest! There is nothing more fun than helping the kids build a lemonade stand to make a few bucks for a special back-to-school treat. You can nail three pallets together to make a u-shape and then paint it your favorite color. Let the kids make the sign and the lemonade and you’re ready to start selling.

Set Up Yard Game Olympics

Here is a great idea for a group. Get everyone to help set up “Yard Game Olympics” for a friendly competition that will keep the young ones occupied for hours. From croquet to cornhole, sprinkler jumping, frisbee throwing and a good old fashioned game of HORSE - anything goes with this one. Get creative and make it fun. 

Make a S’mores Bar

Sure they are messy but nothing says summer like the gooey mix of graham crackers, marshmallows, and chocolate. In my house, we compete for the perfect golden brown marshmallow and the first one who burns theirs is out. We love creating out of the box sandwich ideas too.

Create a Mosaic

Collecting seashells and beach rocks is a popular summer past-time, but what do you do with them once they are home? You can get cement at a local hardware store and mix it according to the directions. Then spread it evenly on a planter, frame, a piece of plywood or even a birdhouse. Then firmly press in your shells or stones and get creative with fun patterns. 

Start a Compost Pile

Here’s a great one to teach kids about recycling and the environment. Choose any large container that you can drill holes into in order to get airflow. A plastic drum will work just fine. Lay a few inches of twigs and straw on the bottom. Then begin adding your compost materials. Alternate between green and brown to keep your pile healthy - green being fruit and vegetable scraps and brown being wood, leaves and garden matter. Green produces nitrogen while brown delivers carbon. Maintaining balance is the key to healthy soil. 

Build Your Own Slip-n-Slide

This was an all-time favorite when my kids were growing up. Grab a 100-foot roll of thick, clear plastic sheeting and a dozen landscaping stakes from the local hardware store. Remove any rocks or sticks from the lawn and roll out your plastic. Fasten it down with the stakes and then squirt some no-tear body wash or soap evenly down the slide. Finally, take the nozzle off the hose and position the water flow right down the middle. Now take a dive!

Bob O’Donnell is the owner of O’Donnell Bros. Inc., a Bristol-based home improvement company established in 1975. Email your questions to info@odonnellbros.com with the subject line “Ask the Pro.” All questions may be considered for publication. To contact Bob for your remodeling needs, call O’Donnell Bros. Inc. at (860) 589-5155 or visit http://www.odonnellbros.com. Advice is for guidance only.


Get Rid of Unsightly Crabgrass and Breathe New Life Into Your Lawn

Chelsea O'Donnell

With so much rain early in the season followed by a long period of hot and humid weather, this summer is definitely a record-breaker for crabgrass. This thick, clumpy weed is not only ugly but it’s bad for your lawn’s health too. You might be thinking that since we’re halfway through summer, there’s not much you can do, but treating crabgrass now is actually a smart move that will give your lawn a lush look before the season ends. 

As I said, crabgrass is a weed and just like other weeds, it likes to take over. Once it gets its roots down, it spreads quickly, killing healthy grass in its path. Of course, crabgrass dies on its own when it starts to turn cold, but not treating it means it’s more likely to come back next year. So here’s what you can do today to get rid of it and keep it at bay for next year. 

The best course of action is a pre-emergent, but that’s only good in the spring before the crabgrass starts to grow, so if you missed it, it looks like you’ll be pulling by hand. That’s right, get out that kneepad because the best way to remove the weed is to pull it out, ensuring the roots come with it. It’s been dry for a long time here in Connecticut, but recent rain will loosen those roots up a bit. 

Once you have the crabgrass out, you can fill in the bare spots with healthy grass seed and plenty of water. It’s important to wait to reseed if you’ve recently sprayed your lawn with weed killer as the seeds won’t be able to grow. The water is also key here because the heat does make it tough for grass to grow. 

Now for your mowing. It’s best to keep the grass a bit longer and to let the clippings stay in place to give some nutrients and shade back into the lawn. Three inches is a good, healthy length for both old and new grass. 

If you’re looking for a chemical solution, you can use a post-emergent but this can be tricky as the wrong product will kill your grass. When in doubt, it’s best to leave this job to a professional landscaper who can advise you on the most appropriate course of action. You don’t want to accidentally burn your whole lawn while trying to save it!

Don’t forget, treating your lawn with a pre-emergent in the spring is the best way to avoid crabgrass in the first place. Crabgrass starts to germinate when the soil reaches 55 degrees, so it’s a good idea to get out there in April to ensure that your hard work is worth the effort.

Bob O’Donnell is the owner of O’Donnell Bros. Inc., a Bristol-based home improvement company established in 1975. Email your questions for Bob to info@odonnellbros.com with the subject line “Ask the Pro.” All questions may be considered for publication. To contact Bob for your remodeling needs, call O’Donnell Bros. Inc. at (860) 589-5155 or visit http://www.odonnellbros.com. Advice is for guidance only.